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OFN/Wells Fargo Artist Seed 
Grant: Pivoting in a Pandemic

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Introducing the indigenous artists of the Great Plains who are participating in the OFN/Wells Fargo Artist Seed Grant: Pivoting in a Pandemic.

 

Hau (Hello)

 

My Name is Bradley A Ware Sr. My Indian Name is Davèko (Enemy Recognizes Him or Recognizes Enemy) Kiowa’Apache..

 

I am Wichita and Affiliated Tribes of Oklahoma and Kiowa and Apache.. I am from Fort Cobb Oklahoma but I now reside in Browning Montana With my Wife and kids.. I am a Father, Husband and Full time Parflech Artist and when I’m not doing that I am a WildLand Fire Fighter.. I’ve been doing Parflech off and on since I was about 20 years or or so.. I come from a long line of Parflech ledger artist.. my Great Grandpa Wilson Ware was an Ledger artist amongst the Kiowa People as well as my Late Grandpa Thomas Tom Mauchahty Ware.. I knew once I started i wouldn’t want to stop so I kept going so with that I am great full for my grandpa and my family that keeps me going and encourages me to be better especially my Wife Hollie

 

I challenge myself when it comes to painting or making drums or shields etc. I let the paint brushes do it’s thing because I love the pieces I make..

 

I’ve created many powwow regalia from drums dance accessories to fill on outfits.. but my main focus would be Purses and belts..

My goal is to be more consistent with my work and encourage other Native Artist to keep going and strive to be the best.. with that I said Ahhhhoooo

 

Photo credit Shannon Burnette-Meek

OFN/Wells Fargo Artist Seed 
Grant: Pivoting in a Pandemic

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Introducing the indigenous artists of the Great Plains who are participating in the OFN/Wells Fargo Artist Seed Grant: Pivoting in a Pandemic.

 

My name is Hollie Eagle Speaker-Ware. I am an enrolled member of the Blackfeet nation as well as an enrolled member of the Kainai (Blood) of Stand-off Alberta. I reside in Browning Mt.

I am a mother, wife and a full time beading artist. I have been beading since I was 8 years old. Once I picked up the beading needle at an early age I never put it down. I learned from my late mother Emily Scabby Robe/Eagle Speaker. She passed her knowledge down to me and I’m very grateful for that. Everything I know about beading, creating art, culture, traditions and stories is that my late mother taught me. I now pass down to my children to keep the traditions alive.

I like to challenge myself when it comes to beading. I let the beading vibes flow and every piece comes out better then expected. I consider myself an all around beader. My beading style consists of contemporary style and also plains style beading. I’ve created many pow wow regalia beadwork throughout the years I lost count. On my off time I create native jewelry (necklaces/earring sets) that have become very popular. My creations are seen all over Indian country. My goal is to bring confidence and beauty to indigenous community by wearing my creations.

Photo credit Shannon Burnette-Meek

OFN/Wells Fargo Artist Seed 
Grant: Pivoting in a Pandemic

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Introducing the indigenous artists of the Great Plains who are participating in the OFN/Wells Fargo Artist Seed Grant: Pivoting in a Pandemic.

Han, Mitakuyapi! Wasicu ia Kyrie Dunkley emakiyapi, Dakhota ia Wichapi Iyoyunpa Wi emakiyapi ye. Damakhota na MaLakhota: Sissetunwan, Wahpethunwan, Bdewakathunwan, na Thithunwan- Ohadada hematahan. Bde Hdakinyan mathunpi, Toka Nuwan omawapi, Inyan Okabdeca Othun ed wati. Thiyatata htawani heyatata wakagege na wawiyophekiya, Shinin Star Style eciyapi ye. Chinca wanzi bduhe, Matthew Jr. eciyapi waniyetu zaptan. MiHihnaku, Matthew Dunkley SR. wanna ded un sni.

Hello, my relatives! My English name is Kyrie Dunkley, my Native name is Shining Star Woman. I am Dakota and Lakota: 4 bands of the Oceti Sakowin. I was born in Sisseton, S.D. I am enrolled in the Enemy Swim District. I live in Sioux Falls, S.D. I work from home sewing clothes and selling them under the name “Shinin Star Style” I have one child, my son’s name is Matthew Jr. he is 5 yrs old. My husband Matthew Dunkley Sr. has passed on.

As a young girl I danced at powwows, participated in ceremonies, watched my Auntie’s put together regalia and I learned how to bead pens. I did not start sewing until I entered motherhood and wanted to pass on cultural knowledge and experiences I had as a child to mine. I have given classes, presentations and shared stories with those in my community who are also wanting to do the same. When my husband passed away I spent a lot of time sewing and working through my grief. I’ve learned a lot about mental health, historical trauma, and generational trauma during that time. In May 2020 I put together a collection and presented a Virtual Fashion Show Fundraiser dedicated to MMIW, the funds went a local women’s leadership group at South Dakota Urban Indian Health. I have continued my healing journey by learning more about my heritage, taking Dakota/ Lakota Language classes and participating to culturally relevant events when possible with my son. Earlier this year I qualified for the Arts South Dakota Artist Emergency Relief Fund. My off the rack items can be found at Sweetgrass Soapery / All Walks Trading Post Co. in downtown Sioux Falls those items include ribbon skirts, ribbon shirts and DIY ribbon skirt kits. I am currently in a small business empowerment program offered through the Black Hills Community Loan Fund to expand my entrepreneurship and financial education. I hope to work more with the schools and community to provide sewing services to preserve our culture and encourage our current generation to continue indigenizing their spaces through expressive art.

Photo credit Shannon Burnette-Meek

OFN/Wells Fargo Artist Seed 
Grant: Pivoting in a Pandemic

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Introducing the indigenous artists of the Great Plains who are participating in the OFN/Wells Fargo Artist Seed Grant: Pivoting in a Pandemic.

 

I am Joetta AlRunner FourStar, Cheyenne, Kickapoo & Shawnee. I am originally from Southern California and now reside in Wolf Point, MT. with my husband and two granddaughters.

I grew up in the pow wow arena dancing with family and friends. I was raised by my Southern Cheyenne Paternal Grand parents Jack and Emily All Runner. I learned by observing how they made moccasins. My grandma Emily would do the beadwork for the moccasins and my grandpa Jack would put the soles on. I’ve made all sizes of moccasins, southern style boots and northern style high tops moccasins. My biggest project was a southern style buckskin dress with all the accessories. I have been doing beadwork and sewing for about 40 years now. I wish I had pictures of everything I made. I make sure to take pictures of all of my work now.

I currently make Cheyenne style moccasins and ribbon skirts.

Photo credit Shannon Burnette-Meek

OFN/Wells Fargo Artist Seed 
Grant: Pivoting in a Pandemic

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Introducing the indigenous artists of the Great Plains who are participating in the OFN/Wells Fargo Artist Seed Grant: Pivoting in a Pandemic.

Bruce A Cook, III is an acclaimed Haida artist who creates sculptures, silk-screen prints, carved masks, canoes and painted drums. He was born in 1967 in Ketchikan, Alaska. Bruce began his artistic training under the guidance of his uncle, Warren Peele, a master artist in the Village of Hydaburg, Alaska. Many members of his lineage are artists.

Bruce is an accomplished dancer and singer with The Haida Heritage Dancers, a Haida Dance group that was formed in Seattle to keep the Haida culture strong. Bruce designed and created much of the dance regalia for the group including masks, drums, and leather dance capes. Bruce recognizes the importance of song and dance to Haida culture. In 1996, he worked with Shaun Peterson on the Return of the Story Pole a monumental 36-foot totem pole for the Puyallup tribe. The Legacy Gallery also commissioned a 20-foot Haida canoe for their show in 1998. Bruce was then commissioned to do a 15-foot pole and the interior decoration for the Islandwood complex, on Bainbridge Island, Washington.

Bruce’s style shows reverence for the past and present masters and has changed only slightly over the years. With simplicity being the hardest thing to achieve.

Photo credit Shannon Burnette-Meek

OFN/Wells Fargo Artist Seed 
Grant: Pivoting in a Pandemic

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Shodage! Bulushe Biilaxpaak Chiwikaakoosh Huk! Apsaalookak bik.  

Baashammaliaxia Bilikooshik Baakaatuk Ashkammnuk.  

Hello, my name is Prays for the People. I am Apsaalooke (Children of the Large Beaked Bird) Known to the dominant society as Crow. I am from the Whistling Water Clan, and a child of the Piegan Clan.  My name is Rose Williamson.  

I love to create art. I love to bead, I learned from my mom, but I was not ready to pick it up until right out of High School. I love working with rawhide and paint. I make it into jewelry, belts, and fashion accessories. I sew and can make little cell phone cases that look like my tribes' dresses. My brand name is Lady Pompadour Beadwork and Design.  

I also am a historical interpretive guide. I own Indian Battle Tours, LLC. I give tours about the battles that happened on my tribe's land. I also rent out teepees, Crow Camp Teepee Rentals, to people from all over the world during my tribe’s annual event Crow Fair.  

Photo credit Shannon Burnette-Meek

OFN/Wells Fargo Artist Seed 
Grant: Pivoting in a Pandemic

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Introducing the indigenous artists of the Great Plains who are participating in the OFN/Wells Fargo Artist Seed Grant: Pivoting in a Pandemic.

Darla Takes the Knife says, I’ve been sewing as a hobby for many years in between raising my children and working fir the Indian Health Service. I have not focused on a business until now. I am currently attending a cohort class of 20 sessions for an e-commerce small business of my own with Black Hills Community Loan Fund in a Rapid City.

 

I was raised in Eagle Butte SD, Cheyenne River Sioux Tribe, then moved to Rapid City SD. I was brought up on the pow-wow trail from toddler to my teens.

My Uses The Knife tiospaye from the Cheyenne River Reservation raised me. They hold the Lakota way of life close and are fluent Lakota speakers.

 

I am also from the One Bull tiospaye in Standing Rock Reservation.

I am of the Hunkpapa/Mnicoujou/Itazipco Bands honored with two Lakota names; Hinto Agliwin (One Bull brought back a grey horse from Battle of Little Big Horn) and Wakupiwin (Something given to me).

 

I’m married to a supporting husband Tyrone Takes the Knife Jr. I have four sons Daylin, Storm (Jena), Maverick (Tyresha), Najin and one daughter Amastewin. I also have my sweet mother Mary (Uses the Knife) Zephier by my side guiding me to keep my designs traditionally Lakota.

Photo credit by Shannon Burnette-Meek

OFN/Wells Fargo Artist Seed 
Grant: Pivoting in a Pandemic

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Introducing our indigenous youth entrepreneaur of the Great Plains who are participating in the OFN/Wells Fargo Artist Seed Grant: Pivoting in a Pandemic.

Camdon Croft 13 years old. He has been drawing since he was 4 years old to the present day. Blackfeet name is Naatooyiipooka (holy child). Camdon comes from a long line of artists, picking up his talents from his grandfather Glen Eagle Speaker from (Kainai) Stand-off Alberta. Camdon grew up around art and learned beading at a young age. Camdon is a ledger artist and resides in Browning, MT on the Blackfeet Reservation. Making many of his ancestors proud.

Photo credit Shannon Burnette-Meek

OFN/Wells Fargo Artist Seed 
Grant: Pivoting in a Pandemic

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Introducing the indigenous artists of the Great Plains who are participating in the OFN/Wells Fargo Artist Seed Grant: Pivoting in a Pandemic.

Beau Merrival was born in Rapid City, SD. He grew up on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation and is an enrolled member of the Oglala Sioux Tribe, where he learned cultural history and beading techniques from artists and mentors in his community.

His works are artful forms of expression, identity, and most importantly cultural history. He uses his identity and circumstance to tell his life story, which is a mixture of past and present. He is passionate about passing down his years of knowledge and keeping his culture alive.

Photo credit by Shannon Burnette-Meek

OFN/Wells Fargo Artist Seed 
Grant: Pivoting in a Pandemic

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Introducing the indigenous artists of the Great Plains who are participating in the OFN/Wells Fargo Artist Seed Grant: Pivoting in a Pandemic. 

Talissa Abeyta: I am a Native American contemporary artist. I am a descendant of the Eastern Shoshone/ Northern Arapaho/ Paiute tribes. I was raised on the Wind River Indian Reservation located in Wyoming. My native heritage is the inspiration for my work.

My artwork combines Native American patterns, designs and traditions with contemporary design and approaches. I like to use acrylic paint, watercolor, printmaking, and ledger art.

I am a compassionate optimist who is inspired by love, heritage, and life. I feel blessed to have this present day experience of being a Native American woman. My art allows me to have a voice and freedom to express my thoughts and emotions without restraint. The way I feel I can best represent the love I have for my heritage and people is by creating art that depicts Native Americans in beauty, grace, resilience, and strength. Of course all the while paying my respects to their individual expression between and within Native American communities. There is so much diversity in culture between tribes and I find their individual uniqueness beautiful. It is my hope to make it obvious both our humanity and divinity. I aspire to reconcile, heal and enlighten through my artwork.

Photo Credit by Shannon Burnette-Meek

OFN/Wells Fargo Artist Seed 
Grant: Pivoting in a Pandemic

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Introducing the indigenous artists of the Great Plains who are participating in the OFN/Wells Fargo Artist Seed Grant: Pivoting in a Pandemic.

Claire Charlo is a member of the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes. Claire grew up on the Flathead Reservation, raised by parents ahead of their time. Homeschooled and taught cultural lessons on medicinal plants, Salish language, beading, and tanning hides for regalia and moccasin making. Claire started beading at young age, while living summers at Agnes Vanderburg's Cultural camp. While loving beading, Claire left her home to attend Cornell College, and then went on to get a Juris Doctorate from Arizona School of Law. Currently, Claire works as a Civil Advocate with Tribal Defender's office. In her spare time, Claire beads, writes poetry/short articles, organizes awareness events for Murdered Missing Indigenous Relatives and is Land & Water Protector.

Photo credit Shannon Burnette-Meek

OFN/Wells Fargo Artist Seed 
Grant: Pivoting in a Pandemic

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Introducing the indigenous artists of the Great Plains who are participating in the OFN/Wells Fargo Artist Seed Grant: Pivoting in a Pandemic. All of the artists have achieved three milestones and are halfway thru the program.

Rebekah Jarvey, an indigenous fashionista, beader, & sewer from Rocky Boy, MT. She is a tribal enrolled member of the Chippewa Cree Tribe and Blackfeet decedent. She mixes her traditional tribal heritage with her crafting skills and the fashion of today to created modern urban authentic handmade masks and ribbon skirts. She also shares her passion for Indigenous fashion on Airbnb online experiences. She believes it’s her responsibility to make sure the collector is looking stylish with a strong sense of culture

Recently, she's been featured on KFYR TV, First Peoples Fund, Tribal Business News, MTN News, Valley News Live, Native News Online, Zolota Magazine, and Hi-Line Today.

Connect with Rebekah:

— Website: https://rebekahjarvey.com

— Instagram: https://instagram.com/rebekah.jarvey

— Facebook: https://facebook.com/Rebekah-Jarvey-Sewist-108058850990210

— Facebook: https://facebook.com/Honor-Our-Legacy-Fashion-Show-108755707176241

__Airbnb: https://www.airbnb.com/experiences/2191083

Photo credit Shannon Burnette-Meek

OFN/Wells Fargo Artist Seed 
Grant: Pivoting in a Pandemic

Introducing the indigenous artists of the Great Plains who are participating in the OFN/Wells Fargo Artist Seed Grant: Pivoting in a Pandemic. All of the artists have achieved three milestones and are halfway thru the program.

My name is KellyRose OBennick, in enrolled member of the Confederate Salish and Kootenai tribes of Montana and I reside in St. Ignatius Montana. I have always wanted to own my own business, and recently got into beading and beading Suppliers. I want to have a mobile bead store and possible one day a store front. I'm very grateful to be in the program and have learned lots. I wanted to start the new year of this year, by selling supplies. But decoded to wait to learn more from the program and I am super glad I waited. In the past few months, I have learned alot and fell confident, that I will be successful in my business adventure.

Photo credit Shannon Burnette-Meek

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OFN/Wells Fargo Artist Seed 
Grant: Pivoting in a Pandemic

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Introducing the indigenous artists of the Great Plains who are participating in the OFN/Wells Fargo Artist Seed Grant: Pivoting in a Pandemic. All of the artists have achieved three milestones and are halfway thru the program.

Patrick Joel Pulliam, Oglala Lakota. Born on the Pine Ridge Reservation in 1968. Under the BIA relocation program in the 1960’s Joe’s family would first move to Oakland, CA then on to settle in Minneapolis, MN where he was raised till the age of 10. Returning to the Pine Ridge reservation in 1979, he attended Pine Ridge School graduating in June 1987. Later that year he entered the US Army as an artillery man with the 7th infantry division, Ft. Ord California. In 1989 he was deployed to Panama for OJC (Operation Just Cause). After the Army Joe attended graphic design school at Salt Lake Community College and Institute of American Indian Arts. After college Joe moved back to the reservation and freelanced as a graphic designer and t-shirt artist. He made many contributions to his community in the form of artwork, murals, and business logo designs, as well as designing the annual community pow-wow Oglala Nation Fair poster and t-shirts for 25 years. In 2016, the National Museum of the American Indian at the Smithsonian purchased 5 of his original ledger artworks to be featured in their permanent collection. He has won awards at the annual Red Cloud Art show and Black Hills Pow-wow. 

Photo credit Shannon Burnette-Meek

OFN/Wells Fargo Artist Seed Grant: Pivoting in a Pandemic

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Introducing the indigenous artists of the Great Plains who are participating in the OFN/Wells Fargo Artist Seed Grant: Pivoting in a Pandemic. All of the artists have achieved three milestones and are halfway thru the program.

Norma Baker-Flying Horse is an enrolled member of the Mandan Hidatsa Arikara Nation. A member of the Hidatsa, Dakota Sioux and Assiniboine Tribes and a member of the Prairie Chicken Clan of her Hidatsa people, Norma is the owner of the Native American Fashion line, Red Berry Woman.

Red Berry Woman, named after Norma’s given Native name, has been seen throughout Indian Country, having been worn by tribal members who represent their Indigenous nations from politicians to pageant contestants, pageant queens, title holders, to the film and music industries.

Red Berry Woman has also been featured on international runways such as Vancouver Fashion Week, Paris Fashion Week, and various runways of New York City.

Red Berry Woman was worn on the 2018 Oscar stage by Standing Rock Sioux member and activist, Alice Brownotter during the Andra Day and Common performance. This event earned Ted Berry Woman the title of First Contemporary Native American Fashion Designer to have a gown won on the Oscar televised event. Red Berry Woman was also seen walking the red carpet of the 2019 Grammy Awards.

Red Berry Woman was recently named International Indigenous Designer of the year for 2020 by the International Indigenous Fashion Week.

Photo Credit Melanie Sioux Photography

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Black Hills Community Loan Fund in Partnership with Native POP: People of the Plains in Response to COVID-19 is Launching an Artist Business Development & Technology Program and is Seeking Applicants

 

Two Rapid City Native Non-Profits Offer Strategic Plan support to Great Plains Native Artists impacted by the pandemic.   

 

(Rapid City, SD 2020) — Black Hills Community Loan Fund (BHCLF), a Native community development financial institution (CDFI) located in Rapid City, is partnering with the local organization Native POP: People of the Plains to provide a unique approach to helping Native artists advance economically through the COVID-19 pandemic. Currently, Indigenous artists are unable to sell their products through the typical public venues such as art festivals, pow-wows, and museums. Though this project artists will be offered opportunities to enhance their business.

 

Mid-November BHCLF received the 2020 Native CDFI Seed Capital Award designed to assist with implementing a compelling project with great potential. BHCLF in partnership with Native POP a local native arts market and cultural celebration will use the Native CDFI Seed Capital Award to support Lakota, Dakota, and Nakota artists during this unprecedented time.

BHCLF and Native Pop will be teaching Great Plains artists how to effectively strategize their business plan to meet today’s needs for social distancing and online sales. Great Plains Fine Art Artists in need of a business plan, marketing or coaching on their current business strategy in order to promote and sell their art online are encouraged to apply. Space is limited to 20 Native POP Great Plains artists. Selection will begin early 2021 with services beginning in January. Deadline to apply is December 31, 2020.

 

Services and education include: 

 

— Business plan development, entrepreneurship class certification, merchant service set up, marketing services, website development, website hosting fees (up to one year), up to 10 hours website maintenance fees. 

 

Applicants may apply at: https://artsrapidcity.wufoo.com/forms/zguik9y14t6p0x/

Or email info@nativepop.org for more information. 

 

Black Hills Community Loan Fund is a 501(c)3, Native CDFI that is dedicated to creating financial opportunities for economically disadvantaged families who aim to strengthen their financial future in the Black Hills Region.  BHCLF is located downtown Rapid City SD more information can be found at BHCLF.org.

 

Native POP is a 501(c)3 art market whose mission is to share cultures from the tribes of the Great Plains and further intercultural dialogue by organizing a successful Native art and cultural events in Rapid City, South Dakota.

THANK YOU FOR GIVING TO THE BHCLF 
FUNDRAISER FOR YOUTH FINANCIAL LITERACY

 

CASH THE PHEASANT MADE IT OVER 500 MILES! 

 

As we all know now that we are adults... financial literacy is just one issue at the forefront of helping our communities thrive. The more we are able to help prepare our youth for adulthood in terms of their financial wellness, the more their household stress decreases and the less it impacts their future livelihood.

 

This was congruent with South Dakota Day of Giving and GIVING TUESDAY! 

#bhcashwins #givingtuesday #forsouthdakota

 

We appreciate any donation you are able to give! 

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CELEBRATING NATIVE CDFIS ADVANCING FINANCIAL RECOVERY OF LOCAL ECONOMIES: BHCLF RECEIVES GRANT

Oweesta Corporation (Oweesta) and NDN Collective continue to stand in solidarity with Indigenous communities who remain uniquely affected by the COVID-19 pandemic. Together as an Indigenous-led partnership, we are awarding a combined $1,250,000 in grants to 25 Native CDFIs through our COVID-19 Grant Program. These Native CDFIs will further their roles as the economic engines for financial sovereignty in Indian Country through the COVID-19 Grant Program. 

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BHCLF offers a one-day Saturday course, or 2 evening course using the Building Native Communities curriculum, designed to help Native Americans adapt traditional skills of resource management to the wise management of financial resources. The course covers:

 

Developing a spending plan. 

Setting up checking and savings accounts. 

Understanding credit and credit reports. 

Monitoring your credit. 

 

If you, a friend, or refer someone you to know to complete this free course and begin your financial wellness journey!

What an honor!

BHCLF has won the one of the 2020 Native CDFI awards! 

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November Newsletter

 

Please read our current updates and please feel free to sign up for our monthly newsletters! 

Thanks for submitting!

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BHCLF has a new address 

We have moved... down the hall! 

We aren't moving far, just down the hall to be exact. You can find BHCLF offices in Suite 113.

 

Due to COVID19, office procedures are still being honored, and we will be doing our best to service your needs. 

New Address: 

607 1/2 Mt. Rushmore Rd. 

Suite 113

Rapid City, SD 57701 

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First Nations OWEESTA Corp grows partnership with BHCLF 

 

Rapid City, SD (June 18, 2020) — BHCLF is excited to announce our partnership with First Nations OWEESTA Corporation is growing. This partnership helps BHCLF provide a range of asset-building products and services, including financial education and financial products. These asset-building tools stimulate our local economy by providing members the opportunity to acquire financial management skills, build and accumulate assets through small business creation, homeownership, education, and much more. BHCLF is a Native Certified Community Development Financial Institution (CDFI) located in Rapid City, South Dakota and committed to helping individuals and families in the Black Hills to achieve their highest financial goals. 

BHCLF has new office procedures 

Office Access Restrictions

In response to COVID-19 and to safely serve our community, we are modifying our operations.

Effective until further notice, Black Hills Community Loan Fund Inc. will have limited office access. Necessary precautions and PPE’s utilization will be observed, face masks will be required and provided. Temperature will be taken at the door and please sign in. 

 

Our lending, education and technical assistance can also be accessed through technology. Please visit our website or call the office at 605-519-5124 for more information.

 

Request for Services

The loan application can be accessed online. You can download, complete, and return via email  shannona@bhclf.org or olebeau@bhclf.org

 

Pending Applications or Paperwork:

If you do not have an appointment or cannot submit paperwork electronically, please seal in a Ziplock bag and deposit in the appropriate depository a the BHCLF offices. A staff member at BHCLF will follow up upon receipt.

 

Small Business Loan Clients:

If you are a current loan client, please contact us immediately if you are experiencing a financial hardship due to impacts of COVID-19. We are here to support you and will do our best to work with you through these difficult times.

To All of Our Clients:

If you are finding yourself in a financial hardship due to COVID-19 lease do not hesitate to call or email us at BHCLF and we will assist you to the best of our abilities.

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BHCLF Official Partners with Rapid City Area Schools

We are now an official partner with Rapid City Area Schools in the Financial Industry Sector. We look forward to all the wonderful collaborations in building a stronger community.

"Financial Literacy Month"  is in April 2020

April is recognized each year as National Financial Literacy Month. This month is dedicated to improving the financial health of Americans through promotion of financial literacy and education. 

 

Originally designated Financial Literacy For Youth Month in 2003, the U.S. Senate passed Resolution 316 in March, 2004 officially recognizing April as National Financial Literacy Month.

 

BHCLF is preparing our schedule of events for April, 2020 to celebrate this month dedicated to financial education through youth programming in Rapid City. We are excited to bring these much needed events to our community! Stay tuned!

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The $pending Frenzy 

On February 11, 2020, BHCLF, through a grant provided by South Dakota Community Foundation, was finally able to fulfill a 2-year-long dream of bringing The $pending Frenzy to Native American youth. Organized by our Business Development Specialist, Shannon Ahhaitty, The $pending Frenzy Game Night brought this exciting game of life to 31 students living in North Rapid City. 

 

We would like to thank the staff of North Middle School and the many volunteers who made this event possible, including Rapid City Council Members, President Laura Armstrong and Lance Lehman (Ward 4), CEO/President of the Rapid City Chamber of Commerce Linda Rabe, Lifeways Counselor Michele Brink-Gluhosky, BHCLF Board Member Richard Abourezk, OLC AIBL Chapter members Sunny Red Bear and Nikkole Bostnar, and Synchrony Financial employees Vince Graves Amber Eagleboy, Duane Curley, Devon Dupris Fire Thunder, and Kevin Popp.

If you would like to bring The $pending Frenzy Game Night to your school, please call our office at 605-519-5124.

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